Author Archives: Anthony Sargeant

About Anthony Sargeant

Retired and living an interesting life - still collecting a range of interesting artefacts from watches and jewellery to 16th-17th Century oak furniture, ceramics, and antique carpets and textiles

The Lacemaker by Vermeer

A favourite painting in the Louvre in Paris by Vermeer. Anthony Sargeant suggests to avoid the crowds around the Mona Lisa and seek out this miraculous gem.

Vermeer - The Lace-maker

The Lacemaker was completed around 1669–1670. The work shows a young woman dressed in a yellow shawl, holding up a pair of bobbins in her left hand as she carefully places a pin in the pillow on which she is making her bobbin lace. At 24.5 cm x 21 cm (9.6 in x 8.3 in), the work is the smallest of Vermeer’s paintings, but in many ways one of his most abstract and unusual.

 

Advertisements

Hake fillet on a bed of Sweetheart cabbage with crushed new potatoes — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

Superb thick fillet of Cornish Hake cooked by Anthony Sargeant. The Hake was ordered from the superb fish stall in Shrewsbury’s covered market. Carefully pan fried and served with a chicken based sauce on a bed of Sweetheart cabbage. Hake is in the view of many a superior taste to Cod. Shown below is the size of the Hake from which Tony Sargeant filleted this portion. The remainder of the filleted portions were fast frozen (it freezes very well).

via Hake fillet on a bed of Sweetheart cabbage with crushed new potatoes — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

Ceres in Fifeshire, Scotland (A. Mason Hunter ARSA, RSW 1854-1921) – in the collection of Anthony Sargeant — Tony Anthony J Sargeant

Anthony Sargeant bought this charming impressionistic landscape at auction. It is an oil on canvas laid on board and measures approximately 35 by 45cm. The artist was born in Broxburn. He lived in Edinburgh and painted landscape and coastal views. He studied at the Edinburgh School of Design and later in Paris and at Barbizon. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1889, the Royal Society of British Artists and the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours.

via Ceres in Fifeshire, Scotland (A. Mason Hunter ARSA, RSW 1854-1921) – in the collection of Anthony Sargeant — Tony Anthony J Sargeant

Honeysuckle scrambling through the hawthorn hedges in the lanes of Shropshire

IMG_5250

It was just a month ago that the late flowering honeysuckle was scrambling through the hawthorn hedges of the Shropshire lanes. Photographed by Anthony Sargeant on one of his early morning bicycle rides in September, the hedgerows have now been cut back and the blossom and leaves have gone as the first frosts of winter bring all growth to a halt till next Spring.

Remembrance of the warm south

Anthony Sargeant and his partner drove down through Europe in an Austin A35 van and ended up here in Sibenik on the Adriatic coast of what was then Yugoslavia ruled by Tito. This photograph was taken on a small wooded resort island just of the coast of Sibenik where small ferry boats took holiday makers to enjoy the sun and the sea. Šibenik is a city on the Adriatic coast of Croatia. It’s known as a gateway to the Kornati Islands. The 15th-century stone Cathedral of St. James is decorated with 71 sculpted faces. Nearby, the Šibenik City Museum, in the 14th-century Prince’s Palace, has exhibits ranging from prehistory to the present. The white stone St. Michael’s Fortress has an open-air theater, with views of Šibenik Bay and neighboring islands.

via Warm summer sun of the Adriatic — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

Dangerous cast iron cogs and heavy wooden rollers in this domestic mangle – children were forbidden to touch — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

In 1940-50s South-London there were few washing machines. The mother of Anthony Sargeant did not have one but she did have a cast-iron mangle such as this which was housed in the shed at the bottom of the garden. The shed was in fact a re-purposed corrugated iron from a WW2 Anderson bomb shelter. All laundry was done in a large heated copper boiler in the kitchen using a thick wooden pole to stir it around (the thick pole rather like a metre long broom handle also had another use – it was sometimes used to whack Tony when his Mother deemed him to have misbehaved). Heavily soiled pieces of laundry were additionally rubbed on a washing board at the large ceramic sink in the kitchen. After rinsing out the soapy water in the sink the wet laundry was carried up the garden and put through the the wooden rollers of the mangle to squeeze out as much water as possible. The washing was then pegged out along the clothes line which ran the length of the garden. This was not advisable if the wind was coming from the direction of the local gasworks which was less than half a mile away, because at certain stages of the manufacture of Town Gas the coking ovens door would be opened and the wind would carry sooty smuts across the neighbourhood.

via Dangerous cast iron cogs and heavy wooden rollers in this domestic mangle – children were forbidden to touch — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

Tumour in the cranium of my dearest daughter – removed by Mr Leggatt at Salford – just in time thanks to Dr Rao Gattamaneni

4982958774_09bae4ebbe_z.jpg anon

The white lump at the bottom left of the MRI scan is a tumour of a rare type –  Langerhans Cell Histocytosis. In this case of the daughter of Anthony Sargeant the tumour is in the bone at the back of the skull but about to penetrate the dura surrounding the brain – it is already pressing on the brain as can be seen in this image. We are grateful to Dr Rao Gattamaneni and his colleagues and neurosurgeon Mr Leggatt for their prompt diagnosis and intervention.