Category Archives: Anthony J Sargeant

Honeysuckle scrambling through the hawthorn hedges in the lanes of Shropshire

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It was just a month ago that the late flowering honeysuckle was scrambling through the hawthorn hedges of the Shropshire lanes. Photographed by Anthony Sargeant on one of his early morning bicycle rides in September, the hedgerows have now been cut back and the blossom and leaves have gone as the first frosts of winter bring all growth to a halt till next Spring.

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Remembrance of the warm south

Anthony Sargeant and his partner drove down through Europe in an Austin A35 van and ended up here in Sibenik on the Adriatic coast of what was then Yugoslavia ruled by Tito. This photograph was taken on a small wooded resort island just of the coast of Sibenik where small ferry boats took holiday makers to enjoy the sun and the sea. Šibenik is a city on the Adriatic coast of Croatia. It’s known as a gateway to the Kornati Islands. The 15th-century stone Cathedral of St. James is decorated with 71 sculpted faces. Nearby, the Šibenik City Museum, in the 14th-century Prince’s Palace, has exhibits ranging from prehistory to the present. The white stone St. Michael’s Fortress has an open-air theater, with views of Šibenik Bay and neighboring islands.

via Warm summer sun of the Adriatic — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

Dangerous cast iron cogs and heavy wooden rollers in this domestic mangle – children were forbidden to touch — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

In 1940-50s South-London there were few washing machines. The mother of Anthony Sargeant did not have one but she did have a cast-iron mangle such as this which was housed in the shed at the bottom of the garden. The shed was in fact a re-purposed corrugated iron from a WW2 Anderson bomb shelter. All laundry was done in a large heated copper boiler in the kitchen using a thick wooden pole to stir it around (the thick pole rather like a metre long broom handle also had another use – it was sometimes used to whack Tony when his Mother deemed him to have misbehaved). Heavily soiled pieces of laundry were additionally rubbed on a washing board at the large ceramic sink in the kitchen. After rinsing out the soapy water in the sink the wet laundry was carried up the garden and put through the the wooden rollers of the mangle to squeeze out as much water as possible. The washing was then pegged out along the clothes line which ran the length of the garden. This was not advisable if the wind was coming from the direction of the local gasworks which was less than half a mile away, because at certain stages of the manufacture of Town Gas the coking ovens door would be opened and the wind would carry sooty smuts across the neighbourhood.

via Dangerous cast iron cogs and heavy wooden rollers in this domestic mangle – children were forbidden to touch — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

Tumour in the cranium of my dearest daughter – removed by Mr Leggatt at Salford – just in time thanks to Dr Rao Gattamaneni

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The white lump at the bottom left of the MRI scan is a tumour of a rare type –  Langerhans Cell Histocytosis. In this case of the daughter of Anthony Sargeant the tumour is in the bone at the back of the skull but about to penetrate the dura surrounding the brain – it is already pressing on the brain as can be seen in this image. We are grateful to Dr Rao Gattamaneni and his colleagues and neurosurgeon Mr Leggatt for their prompt diagnosis and intervention.

Cabbage White Butterfly on Buddleia in Shropshire, England.

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Photographed by Anthony J Sargeant on 13th August 2017 the butterfly is feeding on the Buddleia which forms a wonderful boundary hedge at his Shropshire home. The buddleia (known as the Butterfly Bush – not for nothing – it attracts hundreds of butterflies in a good season). There have been fewer butterflies this year – the weather has been rather cold and wet.

Buildwas Abbey near Ironbridge, Shropshire, England

This photograph taken by Anthony J Sargeant in 2011 shows an archway in the ruined 12th century Cistercian Abbey close to Ironbridge in Shropshire. Although without a roof the basic structure of this magnificent church is intact. The Cistercian Abbey of St Mary and St Chad was founded in 1135 by Roger de Clinton, Bishop of Coventry (1129–1148) as a Savignac monastery and was inhabited by a small community of monks from Furness Abbey. The stone from which it was built was quarried in the nearby settlement of Broseley. The abbey was closed in 1536 by the order of Henry VIII during the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

via Buildwas Abbey near Ironbridge, Shopshire, England. — Tony Sargeant – Anthony Sargeant

Early morning mist below the Brown Clee Hill in Shropshire

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Anthony J Sargeant took this photograph during an early morning bike ride along the Shropshire lanes close to his Home. In the distance is the Brown Clee Hill with mist still clinging to the fields below the top. The sun just clearing the horizon at 5.42am sends shafts of gold onto the field beyond the gate (27th August 2017, Shropshire, England)